Homily: “On Stewardship”

Offered by Father Matthew Dallman, Obl.S.B., for the Parish of Tazewell County on the Twentieth Sunday after Trinity (Twenty-First Sunday after Pentecost), 2018.

One of the primary themes of Saint Mark’s gospel is creation. It is Mark’s argument that Jesus of Nazareth initiates a new creation, and is Himself the new creation: that the new creation is embodied in Him. We see this in even in the first words of Mark’s Gospel. Those first words are: “The beginning of the Gospel of Jesus Christ,”  and scholars have shown that this was an intentional move by Mark to immediately bring to mind the Book of Genesis, which starts in the same way. Last Sunday we heard the Pharisees try to trap Jesus by asking about divorce in the time of Moses, and Our Lord began His response by saying, “From the beginning of creation, ‘God made them male and female.’” And at the end of Mark’s Gospel, Mark describes the women at the empty tomb as full of astonishment. That is a translation of a Greek word, the root of which is our word “ecstasy,” and it is the same word that the writer of Genesis used to describe Adam when God fashioned Eve from his rib, and Abraham when God was making a covenant with him, both moments of new creation. Read more “Homily: “On Stewardship””

Homily: “Religion and the Theological Virtues, part 3”

Offered by the Rev. Matthew C. Dallman for the Parish of Tazewell County on the Thirty-Second Sunday in Ordinary Time 2016 (Proper 27, Year C).

Today is Stewardship Sunday. This is the day each year when we reflect on what it means to be a steward. A steward is someone who looks after something, protects something. Specific to us, we reflect on what it means to look after this church, and what it means to protect this church. By “church,” we mean certainly the physical structures, care of the buildings, the roof, the furnace, the organ, the windows; we also mean care of the people who worship here; and we also mean protecting and caring for the culture in this church, the “feel” of being here that we often do not notice because it is so obvious, the sense of life, the sense of sacred in this space, the sense of holiness and the active, burning and real presence of the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob.

No mature or even semi-mature person needs to be told that the care and protection of a church’s physical structures, the people, and sacrality requires an ongoing financial commitment on the part of the members of that church. Later this week you will receive in the mail pledge cards that ask you to tell the treasurer of the church the amount of your pledge for next year, so that the treasurer, along with the Vestry, can make an intelligent budget for our church in the two thousand seventeenth year after the birth of Our Lord.

It is said, of course that we give to the church not only treasure, but also time and talent. This is true, but there is more to it than that. Read more “Homily: “Religion and the Theological Virtues, part 3””